Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1/188
Title: Negotiating: Experiences of Community Nurses when Contracting with Clients
Authors: Duiveman, Trudie ;Bonner, Ann 
Issue Date: Dec-2012
Source: Volume 41, Issue 1, pp. 120-125
Journal title: Contemporary Nurse
Abstract: A community nurse is required to have excellent interpersonal, teaching, collaborative and clinical skills in order to develop effective individualised client care contracts. Using a descriptive qualitative design data was collected from two focus groups of fourteen community nurses to explore the issues surrounding negotiating and contracting client care contracts from the perspective of community nurses. Thematic analysis revealed three themes: 'assessment of needs', 'education towards enablement', and 'negotiation'. 'Assessment of needs' identified that community nurses assess both the client's requirements for health care as well as the ability of the nurse to provide that care. 'Education towards enablement' described that education of the client is a common strategy used by community nurses to establish realistic goals of health care as part of developing an ongoing care plan. The final theme, 'negotiation', involved an informed agreement between the client and the community nurse which forms the origin of the care contract that will direct the partnership between the client and the nurse. Of importance for community nurses is that development of successful person-centred care contracts requires skillful negotiation of care that strikes the balance between the needs of the client and the ability of the nurse to meet those needs.
Description: Open Access: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.5172/conu.2012.41.1.120#.VSMb50p-9Hg
URI: https://elibrary.cclhd.health.nsw.gov.au/cclhdjspui/handle/1/188
DOI: 10.5172/conu.2012.41.1.120
ISSN: 1037-6178
Publicaton type: Journal Article
Keywords: Community Health Nursing
Professional Development
Nursing
Appears in Collections:Nursing

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