Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1/2294
Title: Dental student oral surgery training-Comparing the impact of COVID-19 and cohort sizes
Authors: Thorpe, Andrew Raymond Darren Scott;Hsu, Joyce;Carter, Eric Francis;Ullah, Mafaz;Cox, Stephen Clive 
Affliation: Central Coast Local Health District
Issue Date: Feb-2023
Source: 27(1):63-68
Journal title: European journal of dental education : official journal of the Association for Dental Education in Europe
Department: Dental
Abstract: Introduction: The response to the COVID-19 pandemic potentially reduced the clinical experience and academic education of dental trainees through reduced supervised clinical sessions. Graduating dental students, future employers and regulators may be concerned over the level of clinical experience of graduates trained within the COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose of this study was to try and document the evidence for, and significance of, this impact. Materials and methods: From dental student data in the 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020 cohorts attending the University of Sydney, Australia, the number of dental extractions and adjunct oral surgery procedures, as well as final end-of-year examination results, was recorded. Results were compared to determine whether differences in experience and final academic achievement existed between these cohorts. Results: The smallest student cohort, 2017, demonstrated greater clinical experience than the 2018, 2019 and 2020 cohorts. The 2020 COVID-19-affected cohort demonstrated no statistically significant reduction in clinical experience in all measured clinical procedures when compared to the 2018 and 2019 cohorts. The decrease in city teaching hospital clinical experience was compensated by an increase in rural placements. The 2020 cohort achieved the lowest academic results, and this was statistically significant. Conclusion: The oral surgery clinical experience of the 2020 dental cohort at the University of Sydney was comparable to prior cohorts. Rural clinics were able to compensate for COVID-19 interruptions to clinical training. The number of students in a cohort, if all other variables remain constant, appeared to affect clinical exposure to a greater extent than COVID-19. Keywords: COVID-19; clinical competence; dental education; oral surgery; rural health.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/1/2294
DOI: 10.1111/eje.12777
Pubmed: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35090185
Publicaton type: Journal Article
Keywords: Dental
Education
Appears in Collections:Health Service Research

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