Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1/1712
Title: Improving the accuracy of ACIR data and increasing vaccination rates
Authors: Miles, Thaïs A ;Granger, Linda V ;Gately, Colleen L 
Affliation: Central Coast Local Health District
Issue Date: Oct-2019
Source: 43(2019)
Journal title: Communicable Disease Intelligence
Department: Public Health
Abstract: Immunisation at the earliest appropriate age and high levels of vaccine coverage at milestone ages are important in preventing the spread of vaccine-preventable diseases. At the Central Coast Public Health Unit, the authors sought to determine if follow-up of children said by the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR) to be overdue for vaccination improved both of these factors. In a quality improvement activity, monthly ACIR lists of overdue Central Coast children aged 9 to 10 months of age were examined. The study alternated three months of intervention with three months of no intervention. The intervention was designed to find evidence of vaccination, first from the last known provider, and then if this was unsuccessful, from the parent. If no information was available, a letter was sent to the parents. If the child was indeed vaccinated, the register was updated. If the child was missing any vaccinations, the parent(s) were encouraged to complete the schedule. On reviewing routinely-published quarterly ACIR data at three-monthly intervals for 24 months after the intervention (or non-intervention), timeliness of vaccination improved in the intervention cohort. Central Coast fully vaccinated rates diverged from NSW rates during the study. In addition, the ACIR quarters that contained two out of three months of intervention rather than one out of three months of intervention had the highest rates of fully vaccinated children. The authors concluded that the intervention improved both timeliness of vaccination and the proportion of fully vaccinated children.
URI: https://elibrary.cclhd.health.nsw.gov.au/cclhdjspui/handle/1/1712
DOI: 10.33321/cdi.2019.43.46
Pubmed: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31610771
ISSN: 2209-6051
Publicaton type: Journal Article
Keywords: Public Health
Immunisation
Child
Appears in Collections:Public Health / Health Promotion

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