Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1/1995
Title: Exploring experiences and perceptions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples readmitted to hospital with chronic disease in New South Wales, Australia: a qualitative study
Authors: Ella, Stephen ;Jayakody, A.;Carey, M.;Bryant, J.;Hussein, P.;Warren, E.;Bacon, S.;Field, B.;Sanson-Fisher, R.
Affliation: Central Coast Local Health District
The University of Newcastle
Issue Date: Aug-2021
Source: 45(4):411-417
Journal title: Australian Health Review
Department: Aboriginal Health
Abstract: Objective This study explored the experiences and perceptions of unplanned hospital readmissions from the perspective of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with chronic disease. Method We conducted semi-structured interviews with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients readmitted to hospital with chronic disease. Interviews covered perceptions of avoidable readmissions, experiences of health care, medications and carer support. Inductive thematic analysis was used to code and analyse the data. Results Fifteen patients with multiple chronic diseases were interviewed. Several participants believed their readmission was unavoidable due to their poor health, while others considered their readmission was avoidable due to perceived health professional and system failures. Enablers to chronic disease management included the importance of continuity of care and strong family networks, although a few participants struggled with isolation. Four themes emerged as barriers: poor communication from health professionals; low levels of health literacy and adherence to chronic disease management; poor access to community services; and health risk behaviours. Conclusions The participants in our study identified complex and interacting patient-, environmental-, encounter- and organisational-level factors as contributing to chronic disease management and unplanned readmissions. Our findings suggest systemic failures remain in access to basic services and access to culturally appropriate care. Family support and continuity of care were valued by participants. What is known about the topic? Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with chronic diseases are more likely to be readmitted to hospital compared with non-Aboriginal people. Unplanned readmissions are associated with high health system costs, as well as poorer quality of life and psychological distress for the patient. What does this paper add? This paper describes the experiences and perceptions of unplanned readmissions by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with chronic disease. Our findings suggest systemic failures exist in access to basic services for a safe and secure living environment, and access to culturally appropriate care that is delivered in a manner which promotes health literacy and self-management capacity. What are the implications for practitioners? Practitioners and policy makers should consider involving family members in discharge planning and other medical care, and funding for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and community services to enhance transport, care coordination, culturally appropriate disability and housing services, and health promotion.
URI: https://elibrary.cclhd.health.nsw.gov.au/cclhdjspui/handle/1/1995
DOI: 10.1071/ah20342
Pubmed: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34334156/
ISSN: 0156-5788
Publicaton type: Journal Article
Keywords: Aboriginal Health
Appears in Collections:Public Health / Health Promotion

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