Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1/2038
Title: Junior Doctor Evaluation of Radiation Oncology Education and Training in Medical Schools and Prevocational Training in Australia
Authors: Windsor, Apsara ;Chelvarajah, R.;Nicholls, L.;Bravery, B.;Shi, K.;Turner, S.;Tieu, M.T.
Affliation: Central Coast Local Health District
Gosford Hospital
The University of Newcastle
Issue Date: Jun-2021
Source: 36(3):646-651
Journal title: Journal of Cancer Education
Department: Central Coast Cancer Centre
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to evaluate radiation oncology (RO)-specific education, confidence and knowledge of junior doctors in Australian teaching hospitals. A 38-item web-based survey was emailed to prevocational junior doctors working in Australian hospitals in New South Wales (NSW), Australian Capital Territory (ACT) and Queensland (QLD) between November 2017 and January 2018. The survey evaluated RO educational and clinical exposure of participants during medical school, and prevocational training and their confidence and knowledge of the specialty. A total of 183 respondents across 17 Australian hospital networks completed the survey. During medical school, 53.4% had RO incorporated into their formal curriculum, 19.5% had no formal lectures and 51.7% had never visited a RO department. As a junior doctor, 73.8% of respondents did not receive any formal RO education. When compared with other oncology specialties, fewer junior doctors were confident in consulting the RO team (21.0%) compared with medical oncology (42.0%), palliative care (75.2%) and haematology (40.1%). Majority of respondents (61.6%) showed limited understanding of radiation safety. On multivariate sub-group analysis, both confidence and knowledge in RO improved when RO was incorporated into the formal medical school curriculum. This survey highlights the current low confidence and poor knowledge standard amongst Australian junior doctors on RO due to inadequate teaching during medical school and prevocational training and suggests improvement through standardisation of formal RO curriculum teaching within medical school and prevocational training.
URI: https://elibrary.cclhd.health.nsw.gov.au/cclhdjspui/handle/1/2038
DOI: 10.1007/s13187-019-01678-0
Pubmed: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31873855/
ISSN: 0885-8195
Publicaton type: Journal Article
Keywords: Cancer
Education
Appears in Collections:Health Service Research

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