Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1/2265
Title: Factors influencing diabetes-related foot ulcer healing in Australian adults: A prospective cohort study
Authors: Tehan, Peta Ellen ;Burrows, Tracy;Hawes, Morgan Brian;Linton, Clare ;Norbury, Kate ;Peterson, Benjamin;Walsh, Annie;White, Diane;Chuter, Vivienne Helaine
Affliation: Gosford Hospital
Wyong Hospital
Issue Date: 1-Sep-2022
Source: 40(1):e14951
Journal title: Diabetic Medicine
Department: Podiatry
Abstract: Diabetes-related foot ulceration (DFU) is a common limb-threatening condition, which is complex and subsequently challenging to manage. The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of a range of clinical and social factors to the healing of diabetes-related foot ulceration in an Australian population. This was a prospective cohort study of individuals with diabetes-related foot ulceration (DFU). Age, sex, medical history, medications, dietary supplementation (e.g. vitamin C intake) and smoking history were elicited at baseline. The index of relative socio-economic disadvantage (IRSD) was calculated. The Australian Eating Survey and International Physical Activity Questionnaire-short were administered. Wound history, size, grade, time to healing and infection were captured and monitored over 6 months. Logistic regression was performed to determine the relationship between healing and diet quality, toe systolic pressure, wound size at, IRSD, infection and previous amputation. A total of 117 participants were included. The majority were male n = 96 (82%), socio-economically disadvantaged (mean IRSD 965, SD 60), and obese (BMI 36 kg/m2 , SD 11) with a long history of diabetes (20 years, SD 11). Wounds were predominantly neuropathic (n = 85, 73%) and classified 1A (n = 63, 54%) on the University of Texas wound classification system with few infections (n = 23, 16%). Dietary supplementation was associated with 4.36 increased odds of healing (95% 1.28-14.84, p = 0.02), and greater levels of socio-economic advantage were also associated with increased odds of healing (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.01-1.02, p = 0.03). In this cohort study of predominantly neuropathic, non-infected DFU, individuals who had greater levels of socio-economic advantage had significantly greater odds of DFU healing. Diet quality was poor in most participants, with individuals taking supplementation significantly more likely to heal.
URI: https://elibrary.cclhd.health.nsw.gov.au/cclhdjspui/handle/1/2265
DOI: 10.1111/dme.14951
Pubmed: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/36054775
Publicaton type: Journal Article
Keywords: Diabetes
Wound Care
Study or Trial: Cohort Study
Appears in Collections:Health Service Research

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