Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1/1293
Title: Exploring the experience of psychological morbidity and service access in community dwelling stroke survivors: a follow-up study
Authors: Sturm, Jonathan ;White, J.H.;Dickson, A.;Magin, P.;Tapley, A.;Attia, J.;Carter, G.
Issue Date: 2014
Source: Volume 36, Issue 19, pp. 1600 - 1607
Journal title: Disability and Rehabilitation
Abstract: PURPOSE: Post-stroke depression occurs in one-third of stroke survivors with a similar risk of development across short, intermediate and long-term recovery stages. Knowledge of factors influencing psychological morbidity beyond the first year post-stroke can inform long-term interventions and improve community service access for stroke survivors. This paper aimed to identify the physical and psycho-social functioning status of stroke survivors beyond 12 months post-stroke. Qualitative processes explored the longer term experiences of psychological morbidity and service access needs. METHOD: A cross-sectional follow-up of participants from a prospective cohort study. In that study, patients and were followed for 12 months post-stroke. In this study, participants from that cohort study were interviewed up to five years post-stroke. Data generation and analysis were concurrent and were analysed thematically, employing a process of constant comparison. RESULTS: Our sample included 14 participants, aged 58-89 years at an average of three years post-stroke (range 18 months to five years). Our qualitative key themes emerged as follows: physical impacts on post-stroke psychological morbidity, the experience of psychological distress, factors attenuating distress and service delivery implications. CONCLUSIONS: The experience of psychological morbidity persists beyond 12 months post-stroke, having a profound impact on community access, and social participation. Clinical implications are a need for long-term psychological monitoring post-stroke and for ongoing rehabilitation that addresses disability, community participation and social support.
URI: https://elibrary.cclhd.health.nsw.gov.au/cclhdjspui/handle/1/1293
DOI: 10.3109/09638288.2013.859748
Pubmed: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24483729
ISSN: 0963-8288
Publicaton type: Journal Article
Keywords: Neurology
Stroke
Appears in Collections:Neurology

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