Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1/1567
Title: Single- Versus 2-Stent Strategies for Coronary Bifurcation Lesions: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials With Long-Term Follow-up
Authors: Ford, Tom ;McCartney, P.;Corcoran, D.;Collison, D.;Hennigan, B.;McEntegart, M.;Hildick-Smith, D.;Oldroyd, K.G.;Berry, C.
Affliation: Central Coast Local Health District
Gosford Hospital
Issue Date: May-2018
Source: 7(11):e008730
Journal title: Journal of the American Heart Association
Department: Cardiology
Abstract: BACKGROUND: The majority of coronary bifurcation lesions are treated with a provisional single-stent strategy rather than an up-front 2-stent strategy. This approach is supported by multiple randomized controlled clinical trials with short- to medium-term follow-up; however, long-term follow-up data is evolving from many data sets. METHODS AND RESULTS: Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials evaluating long-term outcomes (>/=1 year) according to treatment strategy for coronary bifurcation lesions. Nine randomized controlled trials with 3265 patients reported long-term clinical outcomes at mean weighted follow-up of 3.1+/-1.8 years. Provisional single stenting was associated with lower all-cause mortality (2.94% versus 4.23%; risk ratio: 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.48-1.00; P=0.049; I(2)=0). There was no difference in major adverse cardiac events (15.8% versus 15.4%; P=0.79), myocardial infarction (4.8% versus 5.5%; P=0.51), target lesion revascularization (9.3% versus 7.6%; P=0.19), or stent thrombosis (1.8% versus 1.6%; P=0.28) between the groups. Prespecified sensitivity analysis of long-term mortality at a mean of 4.7 years of follow-up showed that the provisional single-stent strategy was associated with reduced all-cause mortality (3.9% versus 6.2%; risk ratio: 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.42-0.97; P=0.036; I(2)=0). CONCLUSIONS: Coronary bifurcation percutaneous coronary intervention using a provisional single-stent strategy is associated with a reduction in all-cause mortality at long-term follow-up.
URI: https://elibrary.cclhd.health.nsw.gov.au/cclhdjspui/handle/1/1567
DOI: 10.1161/JAHA.118.008730
Pubmed: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29802145
ISSN: 2047-9980
Publicaton type: Journal Article
Keywords: Heart Disease
Cardiology
Cardiovascular Disease
Study or Trial: Reviews/Systematic Reviews
Appears in Collections:Cardiology

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