Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1/1467
Title: Relationship Between B-Vitamin Biomarkers and Dietary Intake with Apolipoprotein E є4 in Alzheimer's Disease
Authors: Sturm, Jonathan ;O'Brien, Bill ;Veysey, Martin ;D'Cunha, N.M.;Georgousopoulou, E.N.;Boyd, L.
Affliation: Central Coast Local Health District
Gosford Hospital
The University of Newcastle
Issue Date: Apr-2019
Source: 38(2):173-195
Journal title: Journal of Nutrition in Gerontology and Geriatrics
Department: Neurology
Abstract: The potential for B-vitamins to reduce plasma homocysteine (Hcy) and reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been described previously. However, the role of Apolipoprotein E small je, Ukrainian4 (APOE4) in this relationship has not been adequately addressed. This case-control study explored APOE4 genotype in an Australian sample of 63 healthy individuals (female = 38; age = 76.9 +/- 4.7 y) and 63 individuals with AD (female = 35, age = 77.1 +/- 5.3 y). Findings revealed 55 of 126 participants expressed the APOE4 genotype with 37 of 126 having both AD and the APOE4 genotype. Analysis revealed an increased likelihood of AD when Hcy levels are >11.0 micromol/L (p = 0.012), cysteine levels were <255 micromol/L (p = 0.033) and serum folate was <22.0 nmol/L (p = 0.003; in males only). In females, dietary intake of total folate <336 microg/day (p=0.001), natural folate <270 microg/day (p = 0.011), and vitamin B2 < 1.12 mg/day (p = 0.028) was associated with an increased AD risk. These results support Hcy, Cys, and SF as useful biomarkers for AD, irrespective of APOE4 genotype and as such should be considered as part of screening and managing risk of AD.
URI: https://elibrary.cclhd.health.nsw.gov.au/cclhdjspui/handle/1/1467
DOI: 10.1080/21551197.2019.1590287
Pubmed: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30924734
ISSN: 2155-1200
Publicaton type: Journal Article
Keywords: Dementia
Nutrition
Study or Trial: Case Control Studies
Appears in Collections:Neurology

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